Painting Your Home? Safety Tips for the DIY Crowd.

House painting is one of the most popular DIY projects and for good reason. A quick splash of color is an easy way to give your entire home a facelift. But when painting indoors, steps should be taken to keep you and your family safe. Harmful fumes and dangerous chemicals are known to be in many paints, and can put both humans and animals at risk for illness and injury if proper precautions aren’t taken.

Follow these steps for a fun and safe DIY experience:

Choose Healthier Products

If possible, always choose low VOC (volatile organic compound) paints and primers for your DIY pursuits. These products have less harmful fumes than traditional latex paints, and they’re similar in cost to most premium brands.

Test for Lead

If you live in a home built before 1978, there’s a fair chance you have lead-based paint in the house. Buy a test kit at the local hardware store and test a sample before you start sanding. If you find that you have lead paint on your walls, consult with a professional – it can be dangerous to remove it on your own.

Prepare Your Workspace

A well-thought-out workspace can make the difference between a great experience and a terrible one.

  • Keep your work area well ventilated. Fumes can be harmful to inhale, so open the windows and use an exhaust fan.
  • Never use paint, solvents, or strippers near an open flame or other heat sources. Certain chemicals can be highly flammable, so don’t smoke cigarettes, and avoid placing your materials near a working oven or water heater.
  • Use the proper safety equipment – when painting or sanding, use a respirator to stop from inhaling harmful fumes or dust particles.
  • Use a cloth drop cloth rather than plastic – plastic slips more easily and can lead to falls.
  • Cover electrical outlets with painter’s tape, or turn off the power if you need to remove an outlet or switch covers.

Practice Ladder Safety

If your project requires you to climb a ladder, use the following tips to stay safe:

  • Make sure your ladder is in good shape. You should inspect it before every use, no matter how long since you used it last.
  • Don’t try to carry anything up with you. Have someone else hand you your paints and rollers once you’re up on the ladder.
  • Never stand on the top step. If your knees are above the top, you’re too high.
  • Don’t overreach. It may require a little more effort, but get down and move the ladder if you find yourself leaning too far.

Clean up and dispose of paint properly

  • When cleaning up, check your work area for spills, dust, or other debris that could be a falling hazard.
  • Let latex paint dry out completely before disposing of it – one easy trick to speed up the process is to mix a handful of sand or dirt into the can, then let it sit for a week or so with the lid off.
  • While drying your paint, keep the cans in a safe, secure place, away from children and animals.
  • Clean brushes and rollers with a non-toxic solvent. There are plenty of citrus-based or otherwise natural products on the market.
  • If possible, don’t sleep in a freshly painted room for two days. It will help keep you away from harmful odors. 

Painting is a fun project – keep it fun by eliminating any chance of accidents or injury! A little effort before setting out can make all the difference.

The Many Ways We Use Ladders Incorrectly

Despite being one of the most commonly used tools both at home and on the job, ladders will often be used improperly.  Unfortunately, this often leads to injury or even death. According to the American Journal of Preventable Medicine, over 136,000 people head to the hospital every year for ladder-related emergencies – and 10% of those people need to be admitted for extended and costly stays.

Imagine how those numbers would change if everyone just practiced a little common sense when it comes to ladder safety. Next time you’re getting ready to use a ladder, read the manufacturer’s guidelines first – even people who use ladders regularly can use a refresher on occasion.

Here are some handy tips to always keep in mind:

Safety Starts With Your Ladder

Before you do anything else, your ladder needs to be in good working order. Even if you handle it frequently, you should perform a basic inspection before each use. Regrettably, this is something many people often overlook.

Items to look for include:

  • Cracked or broken steps or rungs
  • Loose or missing hinges or hinges that do not lock
  • Rot or decay in wooden ladders
  • Missing or damaged non-slip feet
  • Dirt and debris, including mud, grease, or other slippery substances
  • Wobble (ladders should always stand firm without moving side-to-side)

Always Set Up Your Ladder Properly

A ladder needs to be set up properly to be safe to use. Improper set up is a leading cause of accidental falls and means that many people are not following even the most basic guidelines. In most cases, injury can be easily avoided by following these simple rules:

For stepladders:

  • Make sure rail spreaders are open and locked
  • Place the non-skid ladder feet on level ground
  • If you are working near a door, lock it or otherwise brace it so it can’t be opened
  • Don’t place tools or other obstacles on the ladder

For extension ladders:

  • Keep the ladder feet level (use ladder levelers if necessary)
  • Place the non-skid ladder feet on solid ground – no gravel or other loose debris
  • Make sure the ladder isn’t too close to the edge of the building
  • Extend the ladder at least three feet above whatever surface you’re working on
  • Don’t rest an extension ladder against a tree, pole, or other surfaces where it could rotate
  • Always use the correct angle. As a good rule of thumb, there should be a 75-degree angle between the ladder’s resting point and the base of the wall.

Practice Safe Use

For those who use a ladder frequently, it seems like nothing bad could ever happen. However, being lax and careless is what leads to accidents. Proper usage takes little time or effort and can save a costly trip to the emergency room. Some good general rules are:

  • Always maintain 3 points of contact – either two feet and one hand, or two hands and one foot
  • Never overreach or overextend
  • Follow the manufacturer’s guidelines on weight limit – every ladder is designed to hold only a specified amount of weight including you AND your equipment
  • Never stand on the top step or rung of the ladder
  • Do not try to move or shift the ladder while you’re standing on it
  • Avoid electrical hazards – always look for nearby wires before climbing

If you can remember just one rule about ladders, let it be this: never take shortcuts! No matter how much time it will save you, or how quickly you need to get the job done, cutting corners is never the answer. A few extra minutes on the job is certainly better than a few months of bedrest!

Do You Have A Prevention and Safety Plan for Your Home?

Most people feel a sense of security and comfort in their home, and many don’t believe anything bad could happen to them while there. Unfortunately, nothing could be further from the truth, as more accidents happen at home than anywhere else. In fact, more than 18,000 Americans die each year due to accidents at home and there are over 21 million patient trips to doctors, clinics and hospitals for treatments due to injuries incurred while at home.

Does that number surprise you? You may wonder how so many accidents happen at home. The simple answer is – lack of care. Some of the most common causes of home-based accidents are due to inattention and neglect. Below is a list of the most frequent causes of injuries at home, and ideas for preventing them:

Falls

  • Banisters and railings – all stairways, indoors and out, should have banisters and railings to help prevent falls. Most states have laws specifying exactly how long the railing needs to be and where it should be installed – make sure to check your local requirements.
  • Ladder usage – failure to take proper ladder safety measures results in countless injuries every year. Always make sure to check your ladder for damage before use, set it up properly, and follow the manufacturer’s guidelines on weight limit.
  • Clutter and debris – a messy playroom floor or shoes left on the stairs can lead to grave injury. Keep your house and yard free of clutter to avoid accidental trips and falls.

 

Poisoning

  • Household cleaners and chemicals – items such as bathroom cleaner, bleach, paint, and auto coolant can quickly and easily be opened and ingested by curious children. Remove temptation by keeping them locked up in a secure place.
  • Improperly stored medicine – as with chemicals and cleaners, keep all medicines away from curious hands by storing them in an appropriate location (such as a medicine safe, or in a locked cabinet).

Drowning

Swimming pools, kiddie pools, and even bathtubs can be the cause of serious accidents in the home, especially if you have children. Keep pools secure by installing appropriate fencing and gates, empty kiddie pools when not in use, and never allow children to play unattended in the bathtub.

Fires and burns

  • Hot water heater – whether accidental or on purpose, many people set their hot water heater far too high, often resulting in unintentional burns. To avoid scalding, set your heater at or below 120°F.
  • Stove and oven – to help avoid accidents involving a hot stove or oven, try to use the back burners whenever possible, and turn all pot and pan handles so they’re facing in.
  • Fireplace – a fireplace can be the cause of a devastating house fire. To avoid such accidents, keep anything that can burn at least three feet from the fireplace, and make sure to clean the chimney and flue regularly.

One of the best things you can do to help prevent accidents and injuries in the home is to come up with a safety plan. Include items such as those listed above and discuss your safety plan with everyone in the household. Adults and children alike should be aware of proposed safety measures and actively work to implement them. The best prevention is to review your safety plan frequently and adjust it as necessary.

Creating a Safe Warehouse Environment

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, warehouses experience around 15,000 accidents, illnesses, and injuries every year. When properly managed, warehouse safety measures can help avoid many fully preventable workplace injuries and accidents.

Use the tips below to help ensure you have a safe warehouse environment:

Set minimum safety standards

A warehouse safety checklist is one of the easiest ways to help ensure standards are met. Setting clear guidelines and providing them to all employees and partners helps reinforce the idea that safety is always a priority. Typical guidelines include items such as wearing the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), proper handling of materials, and keeping floors and aisles free of debris.

Educate Employees

With the proper education, many problems can be prevented up-front. Employers should offer not only a safety handbook, but also first-aid training, emergency response plans, and even an ergonomics guide. In addition, safety expectations should be posted on or near all equipment—forklifts, ladders, hydraulic lifts, etc. This helps remind employees that safety is always a priority.

Provide proper safety equipment

Provide proper equipment and enforce its use. All warehouses are different, but these items are generally recommended in all environments:

  • Hard hats. These protect you from objects falling from above, such as off a ladder or the rack of a forklift, as well as any other head trauma.
  • Eye protection. Warehouses can be full of hazards such as flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids or caustic liquids, chemical gases or vapors, or potentially injurious light radiation which can damage the eyes.
  • Work gloves. Work gloves can help prevent a variety of injuries, from cuts to burns, and some cover you all the way up to the elbow. Make sure the gloves you’re using offer the appropriate level of protection for the job.
  • Anti-fatigue floor mats. These help provide traction in dry work areas, as well as providing comfort and back protection for workers who spend long hours on their feet.
  • Proper footwear. Steel toe, nom-slip boots can help protect the feet when struck by falling objects, or when run over by/stuck in equipment, as well as helping to prevent falls.

Regularly inspect warehouse equipment

Any machinery or equipment that is used regularly is liable to become damaged or unusable. The following items should be inspected every day before use:

  • Forklifts: Do a quick check to look for any visible damage, look for leaking fluids, makes sure the forks aren’t bent or cracked, and verify that the floor is clear and there aren’t any overhead obstructions.
  • Ladders: Check for broken hinges, missing bolts, cracked or loose steps, and any grease or other debris which may cause a slip.
  • PPE: Check all hard hats, goggles, face shields and other equipment for visible damage (such as cracks or tears) before use every day.

Routine Assessments

Periodic assessments allow you to troubleshoot any potential safety hazards before they become an issue. Use this opportunity to go over the warehouse safety checklist with employees and test their knowledge, as well as inspecting their workstations and PPE.

Involve employees

Create a workplace safety committee, and let the employees take control of their own environment. Offer incentives for continued adherence to safety standards and time spent injury-free.

By making safety an ongoing priority, many injuries can be avoided altogether, saving the company both money and time lost.

What You Can Do for National Ladder Safety Month

March is National Ladder Safety Month. This 2-year old event was designed to raise awareness of ladder safety and to decrease the number of ladder-related injuries and fatalities. Accidents can happen even to seasoned pros, but when you make safety a priority at work and home, unintentional injuries can be greatly decreased.

The American Ladder Institute breaks the month of events down into five distinct categories. Take the time to read each one, and think about how you can work the safety tips into your own life:

What is Ladder Safety?

Falls remain a leading cause of unintentional injury and mortality nationwide, and 43% of fatal falls in the last decade have involved a ladder. That’s a huge number! The vast majority of these injuries are the result of misusing the equipment. Ladder safety means taking the necessary precautions in order to prevent these accidents.

Ladder Safety at Work: Focus on Administrative Professional

As the front-line in office communications, your administrative assistant can do a lot to help improve safety. First and foremost, with the guidance of a manager, they can help design and implement safety protocol. All current employees should be brought up to date on new procedures, and new employees can be instructed in safety guidelines during the onboarding process. In addition, your admin can help investigate work safety incidents by interviewing injured employees and writing reports, as well as keeping track of first aid products and making sure the inventory is always stocked.

 

Ladder Safety at Work: Focus on Employee.

Employees can – and should – be involved in the safety process. When you make your staff responsible for their own safety, you give them a stake in the success of the program. Below are some tasks they can be in charge of:

  • Create a workplace safety committee
  • Review the current safety plan and make suggestions for improvement
  • Inspect work areas and report hazardous conditions
  • Create reports on injury statistics and safety goals

Ladder Safety at Home.

Whether you use a ladder frequently or infrequently, accidents can occur. It is always important to take the appropriate precautions, even during the most simple task – something as uncomplicated as decorating the Christmas tree can become dangerous if you’re using a ladder incorrectly. The following are easy ways to make sure your stay safe in your home:

  • Follow manufacturer instructions (proper set-up, weight limit, etc.).
  • Wear appropriate footwear – a non-slip, rubber soled shoe is always the best choice.
  • Maintain 3 points of contact at all times – this can mean two feet and one hand, or two hands and one foot.
  • Don’t stretch or lean – doing either can cause the ladder to tip, causing serious injury.

Ladder Inspection and Disposal.

Using an old or faulty ladder is a common cause of trips and falls. Always inspect your ladder before every use – even if it’s only been a week since you last checked. Look for broken hinges, cracks on steps, and dirt or oil (which could cause you to slip).

With a little thought and consideration, most ladder-related accidents could be completely avoided. Use this month as an opportunity to rethink your own ladder-use habits, and consider how you might improve them.

Shocking Stats About Ladder Use

Ladders can be dangerous, whether you’re on the worksite or in the home. From slips and falls to accidental electrocutions, it is truly unbelievable how many accidents happen because of improper ladder use. In the worst of cases, improper use can cost businesses millions of dollars, leave the injured permanently handicapped, and even take loved ones away from their families. With National Ladder Safety Month right around the corner, it’s a great time to talk about the shocking statistics surrounding the issue.

  • A Consumer Product Safety Commission report states that more than 90,000 people receive emergency room treatment from ladder-related injuries every year. These injuries could be as simple as a sprained ankle, or as serious as a life-threatening head injury. Never take the “that would never happen to me” approach when it comes to ladders – even the most seasoned pros have serious accidents.
  • Falls accounted for 350 of the 937 construction fatalities in 2015, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s more than a third of all worksite deaths – a truly alarming number.
  • In 2016, OSHA reported 2,625 violations involving ladders, making ladder safety number 7 on their annual list of the Top 10 most cited violations (and that wasn’t the first time ladder safety showed up there – it is consistently on the list, year-after-year).
  • According to the National Safety Council, of all work-related injuries, falls are the second leading cause of death. Many of these happen at a lower level, resulting in a head injury, or injury to multiple body parts. While you may feel that you are safe as long as you’re not too far off the ground, any ladder work needs to be approached with great caution and care.
  • Researchers at Columbus Children’s Hospital’s Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP) in Ohio found that 97 percent of ladder-related injuries occurred at homes, farms and other non-occupational settings. Accidents can happen during even the most benign activities, such as hanging Christmas lights or painting a wall. Proper safety measures are always important!
  • Over the last 10 years, ladder-related injuries have increased by 50%. That means that despite the prolific amount of safety information floating around out there, we are somehow becoming less safe! There is no reason this should be happening.

As National Ladder Safety Month approaches, take the time to think about how you could improve your own ladder safety habits, both in the house and on the job. The OSHA Portable Ladder Safety Quick Card is a great reference tool that you can keep folded up in your wallet, or pinned to your fridge. With a little thought and consideration, many ladder-related accidents can be avoided right from the start.

10 Ways to Prevent Falls at Home

Older adults aren’t the only ones who need to worry about falls at home. Many households could benefit from a fall-prevention assessment. While the elderly are at increased risk, people of all ages end up in the hospital every single year due to preventable falls. Such injuries can lead to limited mobility, reduced activity, lost work time, inability to participate in recreational activities, and even loss of life.

Here are 10 ways you can help keep your own home safe:

  • Remove clutter. From playrooms with toys strewn all over the floor, to home offices with stacks of paper everywhere, your house might just be one giant fall risk. Keep the messes at a minimum to reduces trips and falls.
  • Arrange furniture appropriately. Always make sure there is plenty of space between furniture to move around freely, without bumping into anything. In addition, make sure any area rugs are properly secured, to avoid slipping when you step on them, or tripping over a raised edge.
  • Invest in a bathroom rug. The bathroom floor can get slick with condensation after a hot shower, or can quickly turn into a pond with kids splashing around in the tub. A cheap rug is an easy way to give yourself somewhere to stand when the floor is unsafe.
  • Keep your shower safe. While we’re on the subject of your bathroom – showers and bathtubs are a huge fall risk. Go out and pick up some of those little non-slip appliques or a non-slip mat to help prevent any accidents while you’re soaping up.
  • Clean up spills immediately. From a knocked-over dog water bowl to a spilled cup of juice, any puddle on the floor is a danger. Make sure any liquid messes get cleaned up asap.
  • Keep wires and cords out of the way. In today’s homes, electronics are all over the place. Between multiple televisions, computers, video game consoles, and cell phone chargers, there are more wires laying around than ever before. Keep those wires clear of walkways, and, if possible, invest in a device such as this to help keep them contained.
  • Install railings in all stairways. If you live in a multi-level house, it is essential to have proper handrails installed in all stairways. In fact, in most states, your home won’t even pass inspection without the proper railings.
  • Practice proper ladder safety. Ladders are one of the leading causes of fall-related injuries in the home, year-after-year. Keep yourself safe by always choosing the correct ladder for the job and always following the manufacturer’s safety guidelines.
  • If you have small children, use baby gates where necessary. As anyone with children knows, babies and toddlers love climbing things they shouldn’t. Baby gates should be installed both at the foot of and the top of stairwells, as well as anywhere there is a fall risk. For instance, if your kitchen is recessed, and you have to step down to go into the room, you should probably put a gate in the doorway.
  • Keep walkways neat. It’s easy to ignore the messes outside your house, but they’re a litigation waiting to happen! You want to keep your own family safe, of course, but keep in mind – if a stranger trips over those gardening tools you left on the sidewalk, they could sue you for any injury-related medical bills.

If you follow these simple tips and stay mindful of your surroundings, you should easily avoid most trips and falls within the home.

Creating a Safety Culture at Work

Safety culture, a behavior-based concept developed by H.W. Heinrich in the 1930s and 1940s, was originally created so employers would have a way to observe and change unsafe worker behavior. Unfortunately, this placed all the blame for accidents directly on the employees. Today’s bosses realize that workers aren’t always to blame, and outside factors are taken into consideration. he modern safety culture is the end result of combined individual and group efforts toward values, attitudes, goals, and proficiency of an organization’s health and safety program. Below are some tips for creating an inclusive, healthy safety culture at your own workplace.

Create an official safety plan

  • The aim of your plan should be building safe habits and a healthy work environment.
  • Covered topics should include: safety policies, goals, and an overview of what “safety culture” means for your organization.
  • Responsibilities should be defined for workers at every level, from the CEO down.
  • Educate all employees about your safety plan. It is the #1 thing you can do to help get everyone on the same page.
  • Prepare for an increase in incidents up-front, especially if there was no official plan in place for reporting things in the past.

Create a culture of accountability

  • Identify changes that need to be made within the organization and assign responsibility to make those changes.
  • Hold managers and leaders responsible just as much as everyone else – this helps create a good example for the rest of the employees.
  • Provide multiple options for reporting incidents. Some employees will not be comfortable reporting an accident face-to-face. Other options should include submitting a written report, or filling out an online form.

Create good working relationships

  • Set clear expectations for employees at all levels.
  • Seek to understand problems, rather than assign blame.
  • Acknowledge a job well-done.
  • Make sure employees feel safe reporting incidents without fear of retribution.

Provide positive feedback

  • When employees feel like their efforts are noticed, it gives them a reason to go above and beyond.
  • Consider offering a small incentive for safe behavior, such as extra time off, or a company outing. Just be careful – it is easy to create an environment in which employees don’t report incidents in order to earn their reward. It all comes back to having that trusting relationship!
  • When an employee­­ is positively motivated, by reward, or just positive feedback, they will look for safety violations, report unsafe behavior, and suggest corrections more freely than they did before.

When you’re creating a safety culture at work, make sure everyone is aware of your plans and stays updated throughout the process. A team that is made part of plan development is a team that will fight to make it work.

Classic Mistakes People Make on Ladders

Each year, there are more than 164,000 emergency room-treated injuries and 300 deaths in the U.S. that are caused by falls from ladders. The problem? Most people don’t treat ladders with the appropriate amount of respect. Just like a chainsaw or a nail gun, a ladder has the potential to cause serious injury. Accidents can occur during even the most common, mundane tasks -cleaning gutters, putting up Christmas lights, or painting the house can turn dangerous in an instant. Below are some of the most common mistakes people make on ladders:

Using the ladder improperly

  • Your ladder should always be set on an even surface. Setting your ladder on gravel or loose ground could cause it to tip, and you to fall.
  • Make sure the spreaders (the littl­e bars between the legs of a stepladder) are locked. When not locked, the ladder can fold in on itself and collapse.
  • Set the ladder at the correct angle. An extension ladder should be set so it is sitting at a 75-degree angle from the ground.

Not choosing the correct ladder for the job

It might be easier to just buy one ladder and use it for all your tasks, but it’s also incredibly dangerous. Not all ladders are intended for all uses – for instance, a step ladder shouldn’t be leaned against a wall and an aluminum ladder shouldn’t be used for electrical work.

Not inspecting the ladder before each use.

Using a defective or broken ladder can lead to grave injury. Wooden ladders are especially prone to rot and decay, but all ladders can become damaged. Before use, check for cracks in rungs, loose bolts and hinges, and general wear and tear. In addition, check for cleanliness, as grease, mud, or other debris could cause you to slip and fall.

Not being careful

  • Maintain three points of contact on your ladder at all times. This could mean both feet and one hand, or both hands and one foot.
  • Don’t lean too far away from the ladder. If an object is out of your reach, climb down and pick it up, then climb back up.
  • Always face the correct direction. You should never turn around backwards on the ladder. Not only are you facing the wrong way, but it makes it nearly impossible to maintain your three points of contact.
  • Lift and carry your ladder in the appropriate way. If you need to, ask a friend or coworker to help. Many ladders are very heavy, and trying to carry them alone can result in a fall or a back injury.

If you avoid these mistakes and use caution, you will greatly minimize your risk of fall or injury when using a ladder.

Things to Do Today to Improve Safety at Your Job Site

Every year, tens of thousands of construction workers are injured on the job. Roughly 1,000 lose their lives. Many of these injured workers end up needing weeks, or even months off work, costing both them and their employer money. Most of these injuries are completely avoidable given the proper safety measures. Here are some common-sense tips to help keep your workers safe.

Train employees well

A trained employee is a safe employee! The number one thing you can do to keep your workers safe is to educate them. Your business should have an official, written safety policy, and it should be given to every employee upon hire. In addition, regular meetings should be held to emphasize and reinforce protocol. Employees should take part in ongoing, routine training sessions to make sure they still understand all the rules and regulations. In fact, many employers require employees to sign off on an official document certifying that they’ve read the regulations and understand them.

Make sure employees have the right equipment

Always provide employees with head, eye, and hearing protection. It’s not only the right thing to do, but it’s required by OSHA. Each employee should have their own equipment that fits them properly and is free of damage. Gear should be inspected before going on the job each day to check for signs of wear and tear – in particular, hard hats should be free of any cracks or dents, and eye protection should be clean and cleared of any debris or grease which may make it difficult to see.

Keep the job site clean

Keeping a construction site clean might seem like an impossible task, but there are certain steps that can be taken to make your site a safer place. Assign clean-up tasks to employees on a daily basis to help ensure that the appropriate housekeeping measures always are taken. Keep the work areas clear to help avoid accidents such as tripping or getting cut on exposed nails. Make sure spills are cleaned up immediately, and make sure all scrap materials get disposed of appropriately. Toxic and hazardous materials need to be given special care. Failure to handle toxic material in the appropriate way can result in serious injury.

Keep Ladders and Stairways Safe

Ladder safety is consistently within the top-10 most cited OSHA violations at work sites. In fact, OSHA estimates that there are 24,882 injuries and as many as 36 fatalities per year due to falls on stairways and ladders used in construction. Nearly half of these injuries were serious enough to require time off the job. In order to avoid these accidents, a few simple steps can be taken:

  • Use the right ladder for the job. Step ladders, extension ladders, and combo ladders are all intended for different things, and should always be used as intended.
  • Always inspect for damage, wear, and cleanliness before use. Check for broken or bent rungs, loose steps, and any debris or grease which may make the ladder unsafe.
  • Check for weight limit. Every ladder has a weight limit (which includes you and any equipment you’re carrying. Exceeding that limit could lead to serious injury.
  • Make sure you have a ladder that is the right height for the job. Never try to extend your ladder in any way – this could cause it to slip and fall. Instead, take the time to find the appropriate-size ladder for the job.

Taking the time to teach and enforce safety policies up front will save you a lot of lost work hours (and money) in the long run.